Latest News

Cottages under construction .
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One of the cottages under construction.

We have 32 cottages under construction. The cottages are estimated to be ready for use by early next year. The state of art cottages will comprise of a restaurant, conference hall, a swimming pool, gym, salon and play field.

Snake parks under construction.
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Construction of snake parks is currently underway and is expected to be finished by end of August 2011. This is one of the projects that are going on.

Bibilical mountains

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Mountain of curses.

Bibilical mountains have been completed and all the montains in the Bible are represented. Islamic mountains are under construction and will be completed by the end of September 2011.

ABSTRACT of Debrazza Monkey

The De Brazza monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus) are known to occur in Kenya but much of its ecology and conservation status remain unknown due to its cryptic nature and lack of information locally on its ecology and distribution. Three researchers who have previously studied the species - Brennan 1984, Wahome 1989, Karere 1995 and Olubayo 1998 who estimated the population in Kenya at below 200 warned that the species was threatened with local extinction unless urgent measures were taken.
This detailed survey of Western Kenya was aimed at determining the species current conservation status and distribution in Western Kenya, and identifying and validating the threats faced, to make practical conservation and management recommendations so as to check the rapid population decline and habitat loss.
The region covered included the eight Districts of the Western province plus Trans Nzoia, West Pokot, Uasin Gishu, Baringo, Siaya, Marakwet, Keiyo and S. Nandi Districts. Three major ecosystems in this region were surveyed namely; the Cherangani Hills ecosystem, the Mount Elgon ecosystem and the Kakamega Forest ecosystem.
Using the broad survey methodology suitable for data collection over wide geographic distribution over a short duration, information on population distribution, population sizes, threats and habitats status was gathered. Six enumerators with basic knowledge on primate survey and data collection techniques were used to collect data in 16 days over an area of 14,000 sq. km. Interviews and direct field observations techniques of data collection were used concurrently to complement each other in all riparian vegetation known or suspected to have the species in the entire region. Key people in the region like Park Wardens, Forest officers, and local conservationists and Sanctuary owners were also interviewed.
194 De Brazza monkeys were counted In this survey as opposed to Brennan’s (1984) 45, Karere (1995) 49 and 7 for Olubayo & Taiti (1998). By Extrapolating information gathered on this study and that which I have gathered over three years of closely monitoring most troops in the region, the region’s population was estimated at 716. 70 troops distributed over four Districts were located and Trans Nzoia had the highest share with 81.5% followed by Kakamega with 7.7%, 5.4% in Bungoma, 2.8% in West Pokot and 2.5% in Busia District.
Habitat loss was identified as the greatest threat the De Brazza monkeys faced. Other threats identified included poaching and killing for destroying crops and competition from other primates. Most private landowners want the De Brazza in their farm relocated to safer habitats or they get assistance to open a sanctuary for them on their land. It was found out that the major causes of habitat destruction are agriculture, settlements, infrastructure development and fuel wood. There is however a relatively large number of large-scale farmers who have aggressively protected their riverine forest giving the species the chance to survive this far
ABSTRACT
The De Brazza monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus) are known to occur in Kenya but much of its ecology and conservation status remain unknown due to its cryptic nature and lack of information locally on its ecology and distribution. Three researchers who have previously studied the species - Brennan 1984, Wahome 1989, Karere 1995 and Olubayo 1998 who estimated the population in Kenya at below 200 warned that the species was threatened with local extinction unless urgent measures were taken.
This detailed survey of Western Kenya was aimed at determining the species current conservation status and distribution in Western Kenya, and identifying and validating the threats faced, to make practical conservation and management recommendations so as to check the rapid population decline and habitat loss.
The region covered included the eight Districts of the Western province plus Trans Nzoia, West Pokot, Uasin Gishu, Baringo, Siaya, Marakwet, Keiyo and S. Nandi Districts. Three major ecosystems in this region were surveyed namely; the Cherangani Hills ecosystem, the Mount Elgon ecosystem and the Kakamega Forest ecosystem.
Using the broad survey methodology suitable for data collection over wide geographic distribution over a short duration, information on population distribution, population sizes, threats and habitats status was gathered. Six enumerators with basic knowledge on primate survey and data collection techniques were used to collect data in 16 days over an area of 14,000 sq. km. Interviews and direct field observations techniques of data collection were used concurrently to complement each other in all riparian vegetation known or suspected to have the species in the entire region. Key people in the region like Park Wardens, Forest officers, and local conservationists and Sanctuary owners were also interviewed.
194 De Brazza monkeys were counted In this survey as opposed to Brennan’s (1984) 45, Karere (1995) 49 and 7 for Olubayo & Taiti (1998). By Extrapolating information gathered on this study and that which I have gathered over three years of closely monitoring most troops in the region, the region’s population was estimated at 716. 70 troops distributed over four Districts were located and Trans Nzoia had the highest share with 81.5% followed by Kakamega with 7.7%, 5.4% in Bungoma, 2.8% in West Pokot and 2.5% in Busia District.
Habitat loss was identified as the greatest threat the De Brazza monkeys faced. Other threats identified included poaching and killing for destroying crops and competition from other primates. Most private landowners want the De Brazza in their farm relocated to safer habitats or they get assistance to open a sanctuary for them on their land. It was found out that the major causes of habitat destruction are agriculture, settlements, infrastructure development and fuel wood. There is however a relatively large number of large-scale farmers who have aggressively protected their riverine forest giving the species the chance to survive this far

Latest Projects

Cottages and snake parks under contruction.


About us

Kitale Nature Conservancy is located within Kitale Municipality, on the Kitale-Lodwar road on the Western part of Kenya and is situated

God created planet earth. He breathed life into it in the form of flora and fauna. He also created life support systems which are air, water and soil.

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